RockingChair

Front Porch Blog

Updates from Appalachia

AVMountainBorder-frontporch1

A new challenge to fracking in North Carolina

Fracking rigClean Water for North Carolina and three residents of counties where fracking could occur are challenging the authority of the state to preempt local ordinances offering communities greater protections from the practice. Dozens of North Carolina counties and towns have already passed resolutions calling on the General Assembly to hand over control, while others urge lawmakers to reinstate the ban on fracking altogether.

Read More

Appalachian Crayfish: Canaries in a Coal Mine

16382866013_a4cd6916dd_zTwo species of crayfish native to Appalachia are in danger of becoming extinct after years of suffering habitat loss and water quality impacts attributable to mountaintop removal coal mining and other industrial activity. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agency is proposing the species be listed as endangered under federal law. Whether or not they are pushed past the point of no return depends largely on the outcome of a recent proposal by the agency to add them to the federal list of endangered species.

Read More

The economic impact of energy efficiency

hadaway cropNot only can energy efficiency retrofits reduce energy consumption and lower utility bills, they can make a substantial local economic impact. Appalachian Voices is working in the North Carolina High Country to promote and help develop programs that will benefit residents who are suffering from poorly constructed or aging homes, while also raising the market accessibility for companies already working to improve energy efficiency in our region.

Read More

Appalachian communities at growing risk from mountaintop removal

Appalachian Voices is committed to creating a forum for citizens’ stories and sharing the most up-to-date data available about the ongoing risks the practice poses to Appalachia. Today, we’re sharing a new web tool we developed to reveal how mining continues to encroach on communities and send a resounding message that ending mountaintop removal is a must if we hope to foster economic and environmental health in Appalachia.

Read More

Don’t drink the water

dukeplant_averylocklear
As part of coal ash law enacted in North Carolina last year, Duke Energy is required to test the well water of residents living within 1000 feet of the massive coal ash ponds that dot the state. Now, the first round of water testing results are coming back, giving residents and regulators a clear picture of just how widespread the problem is.

Read More