Blog Archives

The fight against the Atlantic Coast Pipeline is not over

Citizens protest the Atlantic Coast Pipeline.

As expected, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission recently gave a glowing review to the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, overlooking the threats to wetlands, forest, drinking waters and indigenous populations along the pipeline’s proposed route.

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Groups blast FERC findings on Mountain Valley Pipeline for fracked gas

Contact information for those quoted provided below. A coalition of landowners and advocacy organizations today condemned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for disregarding the profound and long-lasting human and environmental trauma the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP) would cause.

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Who Profits from the Pipelines?

profit_incentive

Expansion of the natural gas infrastructure through constructions such as the Atlantic Coast and Mountain Valley Pipelines carry significant risks to the environment and communities near them. But they also carry significant financial benefits for the companies that build them, which may help explain the rush to build more and more pipelines.

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Resistance to Pipelines Across the East

As more and more pipeline projects are proposed to bring fracked gas out of the Appalachian Basin, residents are rising up to voice their opposition and fight to stop the pipelines from endangering their communities.

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Pipelines Spark Safety Concerns

The pivot toward gas is especially pronounced in the eastern U.S., with Duke at the forefront of a historic fuel switch.

While both the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration and industry groups say pipelines are the safest way to transport products like natural gas, pipeline incidents are on the rise.

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Federal review of Atlantic Coast Pipeline fails people and the environment

Contacts: Lewis Freeman, Allegheny-Blue Ridge Alliance, 703-298-8107, lewfreeman@gmail.com Greg Buppert, Southern Environmental Law Center, 434-977-4090, gbuppert@selcva.org Ben Luckett, Appalachian Mountain Advocates, 404-645-0125, bluckett@appalmad.org Peter Anderson, Appalachian Voices, 434-293-6373, peter@appvoices.org An analysis of environmental impacts for the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline

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Atlantic Coast Pipeline proposal raises questions that beg for answers

The organization Mountain Lakes Preservation Alliance documented construction of the Stonewall Gathering Line in West Virginia in 2015. The Stonewall line is 24 inches in diameter, which is smaller than the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline. View more photos here: http://www.mountainlakespreservation.org/gallery.html

Photo courtesy Mountain Lakes Preservation Alliance

West Virginia resident and guest blogger April Keating outlines some of the key concerns with the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, including safety risk, runoff and pollution, increased fracking, costs to ratepayers and more.

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Why stop the Mountain Valley Pipeline?

A sign in eastern Montgomery County, Va., announces local opposition to the Mountain Valley Pipeline.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is taking public comments from citizens regarding the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline, which would carry fracked gas through W.Va. and Va. It’s a important chance for citizens to voice their concerns on-the-record. Read some of the reasons why Virginia Campaign Coordinator Peter Anderson is speaking out against the pipeline.

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Community and conservation groups condemn FERC’s review of proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline

Contact: Joe Lovett, Appalachian Mountain Advocates, 304-520-2324, jlovett@appalmad.org Laurie Ardison, Protect Our Water, Heritage, Rights, 304-646-8339, ikeandash@yahoo.com Kirk Bowers, Sierra Club Virginia Chapter, 434-296-8673, kirk.bowers@sierraclub.org Kelly Trout, Chesapeake Climate Action Network, 240-396-2022, kelly@chesapeakeclimate.org Lara Mack, Appalachian Voices, 434-293-6373, lara@appvoices.org WASHINGTON,

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Atlantic Coast Pipeline backers head to North Carolina

Lisa Sorg

While North Carolina is rightfully focused on the coal ash scandal, another environmental tug-of-war is strengthening in some of the state’s poorest areas. The Atlantic Coast Pipeline would cut 170 miles through eastern N.C. where a quarter to a third of people live in poverty. And this is precisely why these types of projects are placed in low-income communities: to reduce the chance of resistance.

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