A publication of Appalachian Voices


A publication of Appalachian Voices

Pipeline Basics

A quick look at how pipelines are regulated, whether they’re needed, and what the environmental and economic effects are.

People in the Path of Pipelines

New pipelines transporting natural gas and gas liquids would cut across hundreds of miles through Appalachia and beyond, putting people, land and water at risk. Here, residents along the route share their stories. Cletus and Beverly Bohon Montgomery County, Va.

Appalachia’s Toxic Dumping Ground

Felicia Mettler

Ohio has more frack waste disposal wells than any other Appalachian state and receives millions of barrels of the toxic waste each year.

Lungless Salamanders, Shrinking Habitat

salamander

Appalachia has the greatest biodiversity of salamanders in the world — and a study has shown that climate change could be shrinking their range.

Fracked and Overwhelmed

fracking site

As fracking and related infrastructure expand, so does the industry’s impacts on local residents.

Sparking Petrochemical Valley?

aerial photo of cracker plant construction site

Plans for cracker plants and a gas liquids storage hub could lead to a toxic plastics industry in Appalachia.

Cletus and Beverly Bohon

Cletus and dog

After Cletus and Beverly Bohon spent almost 30 years living in their peaceful woods, Mountain Valley Pipeline developers used eminent domain to cut down a swath of trees on their property.

Ella Rose

Ella Rose

Ella Rose enjoys watching wildlife near her home in the Virginia countryside. But Dominion Energy’s plan for a natural gas compressor station roughly 500 feet from her home in Buckingham County has disrupted that.

Barbara Jividen

Barbara Jividen

If the Mountaineer XPress Pipeline is built, Barbara Jividen’s “little piece of paradise” by the Kanawha River could be upended.

Marvin Winstead

Marvin Winstead’s farm has been in his family for generations — and he refuses to allow the Atlantic Coast Pipeline to touch it.