Blog Archives

A Journey Through the Daniel Boone National Forest

Sky Bridge

The Daniel Boone National Forest today is the result of decades of decisions and actions — some controversial — by forest staff, government officials, environmental groups and volunteers.

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Out of Frame: Regional Stereotypes in Photography

By Lou Murrey Earlier this year, a photo essay published by Vice Magazine titled “Two Days in Appalachia” provoked controversy over the portrayal of the region in the media. The images were made in the photographer Bruce Gilden’s signature style,

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Renovations Reveal Link to Thomas Jefferson

During recent renovations, a chemistry lab with links to Thomas Jefferson was discovered behind a wall in the University of Virginia’s Rotunda.

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Whitewashing Reality: Diversity in Appalachia

By Rachel Ellen Simon The United States may be thought of as the good ol’ “Red, White, and Blue,” but in the minds of many, Appalachian America is simply “white, white, white” — racially, that is. The stereotype of Appalachia

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Touring Coal Country’s Past

By Molly Moore In 1978, student Doug Estepp was poking around in the West Virginia University library when he came across a newspaper headline describing the 1920 Matewan shootout — a violent episode in the dispute between coal companies and

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Podcasting Appalachian History

By Bill Kovarik Dave Tabler’s education in art history didn’t prepare him to be an Appalachian historian so much as his hope to overcome the way his father “spent a lifetime running away from mean jokes about marrying your cousin

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Appalachia’s Contested History

By Bill Kovarik It has been 50 years since Harry Caudill wrote “Night Comes to the Cumberlands,” a landmark history that rejected stereotypes of Appalachian people as backward hillbillies and described the ruthless exploitation they suffered. The book spoke with

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The Spirit of Foxfire is Alive in Appalachia

By Peter Boucher In 1966, a high school teacher in Rabun County, Ga., tried a new teaching approach in order to win the attention of his disobedient, disinterested students. He assigned his English class the task of interviewing Appalachian homesteaders

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Global Connections

Goods we take for granted today, such as spices, sugar, silk and coffee, were once signs of the early global trade system. This collage of accounts from Valle Crucis, N.C.’s Taylor and Moore Store ledger (1861 to 1874) also includes

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Uneven Ground: Examining Appalachian History Since 1945

By Matt Grimley Imagine two Appalachias: one of banjos, moonshine, and dilapidated log cabins; the other of people, their families, their rich history and unfulfilled futures. That dichotomy and how it is exploited is what University of Kentucky professor Ronald

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