Energy Democracy for All

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Energy Democracy is local people having control of how their electricity is produced and distributed to ensure everyone has access to affordable and clean power.

Two decades into the 21st century, advances in solar panels, battery storage, modernized electric grids and other technologies are revolutionizing how our electricity can be produced and distributed. But large utility companies with monopoly control over the market — such as Duke Energy and Dominion Energy — are keeping us locked into using increasingly expensive polluting fuels like coal and fracked gas to generate our electricity.

At the same time, the increasing impacts of global climate change, including dangerous heat waves and severe storms, are taking a toll on countless communities, but especially disadvantaged communities and communities of color. And monopoly utility companies charge ever higher rates while they knowingly continue to worsen the climate crisis.

But a movement toward Energy Democracy is growing across Appalachia and throughout the country. Local individuals and groups are standing up to demand a seat at the table with decision makers to ensure we transition to a system that is affordable and fair, provides community wealth and jobs, and is built on clean, renewable energy.

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Why Energy Democracy?

Learn how monopoly control and a focus on profit have locked us in a pattern of polluting fossil fuels and ever higher rates

Tell Congress: Support new power plant regulations

Our legislators need to support the EPA’s new rules to slash power plant pollution

Latest News

Open for business — APCo’s energy efficiency program

For folks living and working in western Virginia, Appalachian Power Co. is now offering its first-ever energy efficiency audit program for homeowners. There’s quite a lot more APCo could be doing, but this is a good start and we applaud the company.

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A winning approach for the Clean Power Plan in Virginia

A new study shows that, in complying with the federal Clean Power Plan, Virginia should prioritize renewable energy and energy efficiency and allow for participation in carbon trading with other states in order to boost economic activity, cut electricity costs, and safeguard healthy air. Such an approach could yield more than $25 million a year for economic development efforts in Southwest Virginia.

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North Carolina’s reckless approach to the Clean Power Plan: Part 3

By 2020, and without making any changes, North Carolina will likely be 80 percent of the way toward meeting the federal goal for cutting carbon pollution. But it would miss out on a momentous opportunity to leverage the Clean Power Plan for job growth and helping lower-income families. Rather than resist the EPA, our state leaders should step up and position the Tar Heel state as a clean energy leader.

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Statewide citizens group slams North Carolina’s coal ash pond rankings

Contact: Statewide and Eastern North Carolina: Bobby Jones…

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Environmental Groups Challenge How Pipeline Impacts are Assessed

A coalition of conservation groups is asking the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to consider the combined impact of four proposed natural gas pipeline projects.

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NC DEQ’s blatant bid for control

Over the past few months, the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality has seemed determined to have complete environmental regulatory control with little regard for federal or public input. In this endeavor, DEQ has taken every chance to highlight how external forces, including citizens groups and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, are simply getting in its way.

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