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Coal ash facility in Wayne County, N.C. triggers community concern

More than a million tons of coal ash at Duke Energy's H.F. Lee plant along the Neuse River were submerged by flood waters after Hurricane Matthew. Photo on Flickr by Waterkeeper Alliance

CONTACT: Bobby Jones, Down East Coal Ash Coalition, 919-394-0727, bobbyjones@downeastcaesjc.org Michelle Myers, Center for Biological Diversity, 415-646-6930, mmyers@biologicaldiversity.org The H. F. Lee coal-fired power plant in Wayne County, North Carolina was retired by Duke Energy in September 2012, after burning

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Contending with Contamination in Minden, W.Va.

Minden

Minden, W.Va., residents have been plagued with toxic PCBs for decades. Now the town is on the Superfund list and residents are once again calling on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to relocate the entire community.

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About gray matter: One artist’s experience with the health impacts of coal ash

carolinewithkidsResidents of the Belews Creek community of Stokes County, N.C., have been speaking out about the serious health threat from the nearby massive coal ash pit, which is the largest in the state. Artist Caroline Armijo, who has seen too many of her friends and neighbors die from cancer, is one of them.

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OSM Approves Expansion of Appalachia’s Largest Slurry Impoundment The Federal Office of Surface Mining recently approved an expansion of the Brushy Fork impoundment in West Virginia — one of the largest slurry disposal sites in the country — to hold

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Proposed Coal Ash Regulations Weaker than Household Waste Laws

Nearly three years after the Tennessee Valley Authority coal ash disaster spilled over a billion gallons of toxic sludge into the Emory River in Harriman, Tenn., the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is set to finalize guidelines regulating coal ash ponds.

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Congressional Hearing on Stream Buffer Zone Neglects Residents

By Jamie Goodman On Sept. 26, a Congressional hearing took place in Charleston, W.Va. to discuss proposed revisions to the controversial stream buffer zone rule designed to further protect waterways in Appalachia. Conducted by Representatives Doug Lamborn (R-CO) and Shelley

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Breaking: New Study Links Mountaintop Removal to 60,000 Additional Cancer Cases

by Jeff Biggers, cross posted from Alternet.org Among the 1.2 million American citizens living in mountaintop removal mining counties in central Appalachia, an additional 60,000 cases of cancer are directly linked to the federally sanctioned strip-mining practice. That is the

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