Blog Archives

People in the Path of Pipelines

New pipelines transporting natural gas and gas liquids would cut across hundreds of miles through Appalachia and beyond, putting people, land and water at risk. Here, residents along the route share their stories. Cletus and Beverly Bohon Montgomery County, Va.

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Sparking Petrochemical Valley?

aerial photo of cracker plant construction site

Plans for cracker plants and a gas liquids storage hub could lead to a toxic plastics industry in Appalachia.

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Cletus and Beverly Bohon

Cletus and dog

After Cletus and Beverly Bohon spent almost 30 years living in their peaceful woods, Mountain Valley Pipeline developers used eminent domain to cut down a swath of trees on their property.

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Ella Rose

Ella Rose

Ella Rose enjoys watching wildlife near her home in the Virginia countryside. But Dominion Energy’s plan for a natural gas compressor station roughly 500 feet from her home in Buckingham County has disrupted that.

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Barbara Jividen

Barbara Jividen

If the Mountaineer XPress Pipeline is built, Barbara Jividen’s “little piece of paradise” by the Kanawha River could be upended.

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Elise and Ellen Gerhart

Ellen and Elise Gerhart

Fighting back against a pipeline company with the worst oil spill rate in the country, the Gerhart family started a tree-sit in March 2017 that was still ongoing a year later.

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Barbara Exum

Barbara Exum

Barbara Exum says “there is a presumption that African-Americans do not care about the environment.” But she has been fighting against the Atlantic Coast Pipeline in her county since the beginning.

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Robeson Rises

Robeson Rises still image

A new documentary looks at the potential impacts of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline in Eastern North Carolina.

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Onward in the Pipeline Fight!

Appalachian Voices is working alongside communities and organizations to stop the wave of fracked-gas pipelines.

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Bill and Lynn Limpert

Bill and Lynn Limpert by tree

When Bill and Lynn Limpert retired on 120 acres of rugged Virginia mountains, they never thought they would have to fight against Atlantic Coast Pipeline developers seeking to cut down their old-growth trees.

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