June/July 2014



At What Cost?

Concerns about Duke’s toxic coal ash have prompted Annie Brown and dozens of other community members to meet regularly since July 2013 to discuss how to get it out of their neighborhood once and for all. The group, which calls itself “Residents for Coal Ash Cleanup,” has recently grown in size, becoming more outspoken and more certain of their demands.


More Than a Market

Preserving the “Heart of Appalachia” Tracking the Trails of a Reinspired History Clinch Water Revival: Ecotourism on the River | River Access: A Community Effort Hiking the Highlands: Streamside Technology in the Clinch River Valley View or download the print


Facing the Frontier: Practical Considerations for Genetic Modification in Appalachian Food

Preserving the “Heart of Appalachia” Tracking the Trails of a Reinspired History Clinch Water Revival: Ecotourism on the River | River Access: A Community Effort Hiking the Highlands: Streamside Technology in the Clinch River Valley View or download the print


Murky Rules Raise Questions About Coal Ash Minefill

Preserving the “Heart of Appalachia” Tracking the Trails of a Reinspired History Clinch Water Revival: Ecotourism on the River | River Access: A Community Effort Hiking the Highlands: Streamside Technology in the Clinch River Valley View or download the print


Confronting Carbon Pollution

Preserving the “Heart of Appalachia” Tracking the Trails of a Reinspired History Clinch Water Revival: Ecotourism on the River | River Access: A Community Effort Hiking the Highlands: Streamside Technology in the Clinch River Valley View or download the print

Regulars

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