Blog Archives

Otterly Amazing: Resilient Mammals Stage an Impressive Comeback in Appalachia

By Chelsey Fisher With short legs, a slender body, webbed toes and a generally friendly personality, American river otters are one of the most charismatic creatures in the country. These four-foot-long mammals once flourished in the eastern part of the

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Native Bivalves “Musseling” Their Way Back into Appalachian Streams

By Matt Grimley Waterways are sometimes disturbed by humans, and mussels are often the first to feel the pain. Thankfully, conservationists are working to repair native Appalachian populations of the bivalve. In West Virginia, the state Division of Natural Resources

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Safe Passage

Appalachia and migrating birds serve each other in multiple ways By Matt Grimley Every fall and spring, an ongoing restlessness called zugenruhe begins to make some birds’ wings twitch at night. They will gorge on seeds and insects, fattening their

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Traditional Trout Hang on to Native Waters

By Molly Moore Although they only occupy about 25 percent of their historic range, southern brook trout are doing alright, says Jim Habera, a cold water fisheries biologist for the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. He has worked on every brook

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The Ebb and Flow of Appalachia’s Game Species

By Davis Wax From the mythic, raccoon-crowned Daniel Boone to the adventurous, tradition-minded hunter of today, hunting in Appalachia makes up a long and colored tale. Its most intriguing characters may be the game species themselves, each accentuating a pastime

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The Heated Issue of Prescribed Burns

By Molly Moore Steep rock cliffs, a raging river, weathered heath balds and several types of forest make the Linville Gorge Wilderness Area in Western North Carolina a popular recreation destination. A few rare species native to the gorge are

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The Custodian’s Conundrum

Humanity’s immense influence on the landscape begs the question: How do we best care for the Silent Majority? By Molly Moore A swarthy tree trunk stands in a small clearing, a gap in the forest canopy created by its once-thick

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The Appalachian Voice — February/ March issue

At grocery stores, coffee shops and libraries throughout the region, newsstands are filling up with spring peepers. We’ve chosen this little frog as the cover celebrity for “The Silent Majority” — the countless creatures that share our treasured Appalachian Mountains

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Fox Squirrels Making a Comeback in N.C.

If you’ve ever seen what you thought was a gray squirrel on steroids, what you actually saw was most likely a fox squirrel. This bushy-tailed, colossal squirrel is common throughout most of Appalachia, but was not seen in the North Carolina mountains in several decades — until relatively recently.

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A Golden Wing and a Prayer: Restoring Warbler Habitat

By Brian Sewell Appalachia’s favorite bird, the golden-winged warbler, has been selected as one of seven focus species by a new partnership between the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that aims to reverse population

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