Blog Archives

Born to be Wild

Wildlife rehabilitation centers provide intensive care to injured animals and creatures that have been abandoned while still too young to survive on their own. Whenever possible, the animals are returned to the wild.

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Critters at Risk

The temperate forests of central and southern Appalachia are home to thousands of species of plants and animals, many of which are found nowhere else on earth. But climate change, pollution and loss of habitat are putting many of these creatures at risk of extinction.

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Response to Spill Leads to Action Against Coal Polluter

Our Appalachian Water Watch team was able to document the spill of acidic water on Pine Creek as it occurred in real-time, spurring public outcry and state action against the mining company.

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The Coyote Conundrum

Coyote populations in the Appalachian region are growing, and increasingly they are adapting to urban settings. As a result, interactions with humans are becoming more common.

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Bear Population Rises, Human Encounters Follow

With bear populations rising, wildlife agencies are working to avoid any negative interactions with humans.

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EPA Cannot Regulate Lead in Ammunition

A recent federal court ruling determined that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency cannot regulate use of lead ammunition, which raises concerns over the effects of spent ammunition on raptors and other wildlife.

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Sandhill Cranes: A Winter Spectacle in Southeast Tennessee

Each winter, thousands of redheaded, long-legged sandhill cranes descend upon the mud flats and grain fields along the banks of the Tennessee River at the Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge in Southeast Tennessee.

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Brook Trout Brought Home

By Barbara Musumarra Little Stoney Creek in the Cherokee National Forest is once again teeming with Southern Appalachian brook trout. This fall, the Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute released 1,100 of the fish into their native waters. Researchers will track the

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Acrobats of the Forest: The Eastern Gray Treefrog

By Meredith Warfield It’s mating season in Appalachia, and the region’s deciduous forests are humming with life. Birdsongs may be heard by day, but by night the Eastern gray treefrogs have hopped out of the branches and flocked to nearby

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Otterly Amazing: Resilient Mammals Stage an Impressive Comeback in Appalachia

By Chelsey Fisher With short legs, a slender body, webbed toes and a generally friendly personality, American river otters are one of the most charismatic creatures in the country. These four-foot-long mammals once flourished in the eastern part of the

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