Blog Archives

Southeast Endangered Species Get Less Funding Compared to Other Regions

Conservation biologist Bernie Kuhajda found that some aquatic species outside of the Southeast receive as much as 46.6 times more funding than those in the region.

TAGS:

Clinch-Powell Clean Rivers Initiative Extended

State and federal agencies will continue working together to protect and restore the Clinch-Powell watershed in Tennessee and Virginia over the next 10 years.

TAGS:

Study Reveals Threats to Southeast Freshwater Biodiversity

A recent study shows that human development and insufficient conservation efforts threaten the freshwater biodiversity of the southeastern United States.

TAGS:

Critters at Risk

The temperate forests of central and southern Appalachia are home to thousands of species of plants and animals, many of which are found nowhere else on earth. But climate change, pollution and loss of habitat are putting many of these creatures at risk of extinction.

TAGS:

Preserving the “Heart of Appalachia”

By Kimber Ray Tracking the Trails of a Reinspired History Clinch Water Revival: Ecotourism on the River | River Access: A Community Effort Hiking the Highlands: Streamside Technology in the Clinch River Valley When a developer from New York told

TAGS:

Peregrine Falcons: Diving Back into Appalachia

By Nolen Nychay High atop the cityscape, yellow-ringed eyes squinting in morning sun, the dark silhouette of a peregrine falcon lies in wait of the perfect ambush. As a low-flying pigeon approaches, the peregrine leaps into a dive, closing the

TAGS:

Spelunking the Highlands | Owning the Caves

Worley’s Cave: Worthy of Respect and Care By Matt Grimley With my headlight loosely strapped and my boots tightly tied, I walked into the mouth of Worley’s Cave and I realized something: 28 boy scouts. That’s how many boy scouts

TAGS:

On The Fringe of Life

A Tour of Appalachia’s Biodiverse Frontier By Molly Moore Crouch Knob in Randolph County, W. Va., might be home to the largest remaining cluster of running buffalo clover in the world. As its name suggests, this particular clover once flourished

TAGS:

Emory River System: Beauty and Biodiversity in Peril?

By Dr. Anna George, Tennessee Aquarium “There is nothing more eloquent in Nature than a mountain stream.” On September 12, 1867, John Muir crossed the Emory River on his 1,000-mile walk to the Gulf of Mexico. He had set out

TAGS: